Rommel Manosalvas

Rommel Manosalvas (Quito, 1992) is an Ecuadorian author, booktuber and architect. In 2019 his short story “Disforia” was published in the anthology “Los que vendrán 20-20” by the indie publisher Cactus Pink. In 2020, he became the second “Writing World Cup” champion for his short story “Abuelita,” defeating 5400 competitors from 42 countries. An English translation of his story was published in the Yale Review in 2021. His first novel “Anatomía transparente” was published in 2022.

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Eugenio Espejo

Eugenio Espejo, born Francisco Javier Eugenio de Santa Cruz y Espejo (Royal Audiencia of Quito, February 21, 1747 – December 28, 1795) is regarded as one of the most important figures in colonial Ecuador. He was Quito’s first journalist, librarian and hygienist. His polemic writings inspired the separatist movement in Quito. As a journalist he spread enlightened ideas in the Royal Audiencia, and as a hygienist he composed an important treatise about sanitary conditions in colonial Ecuador that included interesting remarks about microorganisms and the spreading of disease. Espejo was noted in his time for being a satirist. His satirical works, inspired by the philosophy of the Age of Enlightenment, were critical of the lack of education of the Audiencia of Quito, the way the economy was being handled in the Audiencia, the corruption of its authorities, and aspects of its culture in general. Because of these works he was persecuted and finally imprisoned shortly before his death.

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Carlos A. Rolando

Carlos Alberto Rolando Lobatón (Guayaquil, September 13, 1881 – Guayaquil, January 5, 1974) was a doctor, writer and bibliographer. In 1925 Rolando was appointed library director at the University of Guayaquil and also became a numerary member of the National Academy of History. In 1930 he established the Guayaquil Historical Research Center. The National Authors Room of the Municipal Library of Guayaquil bears his name.

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Patricio Rivadeneira Arandi

Patricio Rivadeneira Arandi (Quito, 1953) is an Ecuadorian poet and holistic doctor. He has published several short essays about health with titles such as “Supresión y metástasis mórbida,” “Contrarios complementarios y dinamismo miasmático,” and “Nuevas perspectivas en la alimentación.” In 2016 the House of Ecuadorian Culture published his first poetry book, “Momento,” a selection of 70 of his poems.

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Vicente Rocafuerte

Vicente Rocafuerte Bejarano (Guayaquil, May 1, 1783 – Lima, Peru, May 16, 1847) was an independence leader, statesman, diplomat, politician and writer. He was born into wealth and was educated in Spain. He returned to Ecuador in 1807 and was instrumental in freeing the country from Spain and, subsequently, from Gran Colombia. He served in the National Congress, as governor of Guayas Province, and as the second president of Ecuador (from 1834 to 1839). Rocafuerte’s writings on political systems, social reform, religious toleration, and economic development had significant influence on liberals in several Spanish American nations. Several schools and various awards are named after him, and many statues throughout Ecuador stand in his honor.

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Ricardo Descalzi

Ricardo Descalzi del Castillo (Riobamba, September 22, 1912 – Riobamba, November 29, 1990) was an Ecuadorian novelist, historian, playwright, short story writer, translator, literary critic, university professor and medical doctor. In 1928, he founded the magazine Surcos with his Mejía National Institute classmates José Alfredo Llerena and Arturo Meneses. After graduating from high school in 1932, he published “Ghismondo,” a 100-page novel based on his experiences as a student. He also wrote the novel “Saloya” (1962), a short story collection “Los murmullos de Dios” (1959), and the stage plays “Los Caminos Blancos” (1939), “En el horizonte se alzó la niebla” (1961), and “El huasipungo de Andrés Chiliquinga” (1981). His six-volume “Historia crítica del teatro ecuatoriano” is perhaps his most important work (1968). Among his translations is “Poemas” (1969), a French-to-Spanish translation of poems by Nobel laureate Jean Poilvet Le Guenn. The Tobar Prize was bestowed upon him by the municipality of Quito in 1968. He was a member of the House of Ecuadorian Culture, the National Academy of History, and the Bolivarian Society of Quito, where he served as its vice president.

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Fernando Jurado Noboa

Fernando Jurado Noboa (Quito, 1944) is an Ecuadorian psychiatrist, historian, biographer, essayist and genealogist. Between 1967 and 1975, he studied medicine at the Central University of Ecuador, and from 1976-1979 he studied psychiatry in Spain. In 1973 he became the youngest member of the Ecuadorian Academy of History. He has been one of the most prolific historic researchers in Ecuador and he has published a large number of works. He has authored more than 50 books and 500 articles in historical and medical journals. He founded Ceniga in Quito (1980) and Sociedad Amigos de la Genealogía (1983).

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Carlos H. Endara

Carlos Honorato Endara Garzon, pseudonym Delittante (Quito, December 19, 1896 – Quito, August 2, 1938) was an Ecuadorian poet, essayist, journalist and literary critic. He founded and directed the magazines Ecos Juveniles, Atenea, Bolas y Boladas, and Vida intelectual. He was also a contributor of the magazines Letras and Renacimientos. He worked as a journalist for El Dia before founding Figaro in 1925, an elegantly presented magazine illustrated with Lattore’s satirical caricatures. In 1924, he published “La alcoba de los éxtasis,” a collection of chronicles and short stories.

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Miguel Moreno Serrano

Miguel Moreno Serrano (Cuenca, July 27, 1886 – Cuenca, January 19, 1943) was an Ecuadorian poet and literary critic. He had a PhD in biology as well as a medical degree in surgery, but he never practiced. He worked as the director of the Bank of Azuay, secretary of the University of Cuenca, and treasurer of Public Assistance of Azuay. He was the son of the poet Miguel Moreno Ordóñez.

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J. O. Llaguno

Jerónimo Orión Llaguno Márquez, aka J. Orión Llaguno, aka J. O. Llaguno (Puebloviejo, September 30, 1869 – Guayaquil, May 16, 1965) was an Ecuadorian poet and journalist. He was a founding member of the Press Circle of Guayas in 1936, together with 21 other notable figures.He wrote the hymn of El Universo, one of Ecuador’s oldest newspapers (still in circulation). A school in Guayaquil, Escuela Geronimo Orion Llaguno, is named for him. His best known poetry books include, Frondas poéticas (1909) and Resonancias de mis selvas (1953).

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